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Archive for category: Declutter

4 Ways To Declutter Ahead Of A Move

Categories: Declutter, Organizing

Moving and packing is stressful. It is even more stressful when you have a lot of items that you don’t know what to do with. You know what I’m talking about, the clutter that accumulates over the years and continues to pile up. The vase from your husband’s aunt, the knick-knack from your cousin. Clothing that was last in fashion a decade ago. Threadbare towels. DVDs. When was the last time you even watched a DVD?

Fear not. This brief guide outlines four simple ways to declutter for a move.

  1. Stage a rummage sale

Unload your unwanted stuff and earn a little cash for it in the process. Win, win. Now, you’re decluttering for a move and covering some of its cost. Just keep in mind that your primary aim here is to end the day empty-handed, not with a wad of bills in your back pocket, so price everything to sell fast.

  1. Spread heirlooms among your family

If you are downsizing, space will be critical, so you’re going to have to start prioritizing your possessions…even the heirlooms, actual and the stuff that just holds a lot of sentimental value.  Obviously, you’d prefer not to sell or donate anything that’s been handed down through your family for generations, so start asking your siblings and cousins if they have any interest in it. They’re your first line. Your closest friends are your second. The sentimental stuff especially is likely to be just as meaningful to your friends because they’re the ones you interact with most frequently. Even if they didn’t have a hand directly in those experiences, they may still remember them.

  1. Donate to local organizations

Yes, it’s convenient to toss your unwanted things, especially in the frenzy haze of moving, but it’s wasteful. Best-case scenario: A small fraction of it will be recycled. The remainder’s going to be plowed under at a landfill. If there’s still some wear left in your clothes and some use in your household utensils and accessories, donate them. Scheduling a pick-up with a charity, these days, is even easier than trashing your things. Now you’re moving them to the front porch instead of all the way out to the curb. And you’re helping any number of people.

  1. Auction them off online

If you’re a planner, you’re probably preparing to pack for your move weeks in advance. With that kind of lead, you’re buying yourself ample time to separate what’s coming with you from all that’s not. So add another couple of steps and turn a profit. Snap a of photo of each unwanted thing and post it to eBay, or list it on Craigslist. You’ll be amazed what there are markets for. That said, the aim here is the same as having a rummage sale: to end up empty-handed. So price to sell. And don’t be swallowed by the process. Packing’s a big enough chore. If you find yourself devoting too much time to shipping your stuff or meeting with potential buyers, scrap it and go with the rummage sale instead.

As you can see, there are many ways to declutter before the big move. If you need help organizing a move or you need help packing for moving, make sure to contact Creating Balance. We’re willing and able to tackle all of your organizing needs at your convenience.

Best Method for Clearing Clutter from Your Life

Categories: Declutter, Organizing

Searching for how to get organized, or tips for organizing your home?  You’ve come to the right place.
We’ve got one that’s sure to succeed.

The guaranteed path to living an organized life is to not organize clutter, which we’ll define here as anything that exists beyond the narrow realm of need. So if you rid yourself of all clutter, you will only be organizing objects that hold some kind of value to you.

Remove everything!

Here’s how you go about it: Focus on a particular area. Let’s use the bedroom closet as an example here. Now, remove everything in it until all that remains are bare walls, shelves and a rod. Then, start filling it again, but as you replace the items, make sure to only keep the stuff that you expect to need in the coming year. It may seem a bit harsh, but it’s necessary. Allow yourself the chance to come up with an excuse to keep something and you’ll be less likely to get rid of it.

Keep this in mind: Getting rid of the unimportant stuff helps us see what’s actually important that much more clearly.

Organizing the essential

Once the clutter and excess has been cleared from your closet, organizing the remaining items is easy! It may be a startling sight at first—when it comes down to it, there’s very little that we really need—but you’ll grow used to it quickly. Especially once you realize that organizing your closet now means straightening a couple pairs of shoes, a handful of accessories and maybe color-coordinating a few tops and pants. What once took you the better part of day (if you didn’t put it off), will now take you less than 10 minutes.

Organization comes easily in that type of environment. As does peace of mind.

Cleaning Up Your Life, One Square Foot at a Time

Categories: Declutter, Organizing

Decluttering your home has become a major theme in the past decade.

In turn, many methods have emerged for paring down the material possessions that once comprised your life and now consume it. Some, naturally, are far more effective than others. The approach that suggests talking to an item, asking if it would like to stay, may not get you very far. But if you tend to avoid confrontation, it’s about as gentle as breakups get.

By contrast, one of the best solutions to declutter your home is to clean an area by the square foot, or even the square inch. Doing so not only makes the task feel more manageable, it forces a closer examination of the area in question.

Whether it’s a desktop or a countertop, looking at a certain area by removing everything that sits upon it compels us to assess the value of each item. How you rate them will depend upon your own private value system, but we’d like to make a recommendation: Only keep the things that are valued in one of the following ways:

  • It’s beautiful and/or it gives you pleasure
  • It’s useful in some practical way
  • It’s necessary for record-keeping

If an item doesn’t meet these criteria, either give it away or throw it away. You’re basically decluttering your house as if you were decluttering it for a move. In fact, a move is one of the rare occasions when we find ourselves motivated enough to strip down to the bare essentials. A move’s a fresh start. And who wants to lug even one more box than necessary?

If you can approach each surface, each drawer and each cupboard with this same mindset, you’ll find yourself with a lot more breathing room in no time. You’ll be surprised, once you get there, just how much all that stuff was weighing you down, figuratively and literally.